Christopher Hitchens – Mortality (2012)

Author: Christopher Hitchens (1949 – 2011)
Title: ”Mortality”
Publisher: Atlantic Books
About 100 pages. £6.59 on Amazon. Read it.

It took me a long time to digest ”Mortality” before sitting down and writing this review. In short, this is a non-fiction tale of a man’s battle with cancer (or rather, as he would put it, cancer’s battle with him) and his ultimate death.

Whether or not you like Chris Hitchens’ philosophy, views on religion and his politics (I like many others agree with his views on religion but despise many of his political views), you should read this book. ”Mortality” is a collection of essays and short scribles Hitchens wrote in his last year (2010-2011) after he was diagnosed with terminal cancer. True and from the heart, the reader can – at least to some extent – understand what it feels like to suddenly realise your own mortality.

The book deals (to a much lesser extent) with the thoughts of dying as a non-believer, fairly certain that nothing is to come after the final breath, that this is it. The book consists of seven essays written in Hitchens’ life time, and ends with an eight chapter of ”fragmentary jottings […] left unfinished at the time of the author’s death”.

Read it. Read it. Read it.

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