Att tro på framtiden, att tro på teknik

Med modern teknik kommer nya utmaningar och nya chanser – goda såväl som onda. Ny medicin och förbättrade odlingstekniker förlänger och räddar miljarder liv, samtidigt som vätebomber och allt dödligare vapen kan förinta mänskligheten. Bilar ledde till en enorm effektivisering av hela samhället, samtidigt som bilismen nu kräver hundratusentals liv varje år.1

Teknik kan vara fantastiskt. Teknik kan vara förödande. Och allt beror på hur vi som civilisation, vi som människor, implementerar den. Vill vi se internet som en källa för kommunikation, utbyte av information, undervisning och glädje? Eller som ett sätt att bevaka befolkningen, att styra deras tankar genom att censurera och ändra informationen som når dem, och ett sätt att leta rätt på oliktänkande med syftet att fängsla eller döda dem?

antonnordenfur-jagarpirat Med modern forskning får vi chansen att gräva oss djupare i universums absoluta grund, samtidigt som vi aldrig får sluta bry oss om varandra. Som Carl Sagan skrev – ”For small creatures such as we the vastness is bearable only through love.” Det är vi, inte tekniken, som är goda eller onda. Det är vi som fattar våra beslut, och vi som bestämmer om vi ska fatta dessa beslut baserat på kärlek, omtänksamhet, ett vurmande för personlig frihet och en tro på en bättre framtid. Eller om vi vill se varje människa som en potentiell fiende, om vi vill fängsla alla vi är oense med med målet att själva styra över vårt lilla hörn av kosmos.

Vi får aldrig fastna i att se teknik som någonting fundamentalt farligt. Vi får aldrig hamna i ett konservativt hål där vi blockerar allting nytt för att det kan bli fel. Vi måste alltid se på ny teknik med ett barns ögon, och drömma om möjligheterna. Vi måste alltid ge oss efter att göra det bästa vi kan av vår korta tid på jorden, innan vi också försvinner och blir damm på nytt.

Piratpartiet är det enda parti som faktiskt tror på framtiden. Vi ser modern teknik som verktyg som kan ta mänskligheten framåt – snarare än en bur där vi kan fängsla den. För att återigen citera Carl Sagan – ”somewhere, something incredible is waiting to be known”. Det är därför jag är pirat.

Books of January 2012

I’ve overall been extremely slow with book reviews on this blog, the basic reason being that I never get around to listing and reviewing all the books I read. So, my new (hopefully consistent) project is to keep a constant list of all books I read, with a shorter review along with them. Seeing as I want to give the books some time to sink in, I’ll start with January’s books this month and then list February’s next month.

  • Carl Sagan: “The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark” (1997)
    • A celebrated book deserving its celebration, one of the absolute best – if not the best – introductory books to scientific philosophy and skepticism for both the lay person and the academic. Sagan’s final book before his death is not only a book for debunking pseudo-scientific claims (if that’s your goal, there are much better books and web sites). It is a testament both to critical thinking and to the human species and the cosmos. Sagan postulates that science is not just a nice thing to have around for the practical technology it creates, but it is absolutely vital for our continuing survival as a species, a candle in the dark, flickering and trembling before the darkness of superstition.
    • (A longer review can be found here)
  • Gold, Guthrie, Wank: “Social Connections in China: Institutions, Culture, and the Changing Nature of Guanxi” (2002)
    • This seems to be the best collection of thoughts on the sociological phenomenon of guanxi (关系) so far. With eleven distinguished researchers writing on their own specialities, the book defines guanxi and its many aspects as well as any book can in 300 pages.
    • (A longer analysis in Swedish can be found here)
  • Simon Singh: ”Fermat’s Last Theorem” (1997) [in Swedish translation: ”Fermats gåta”]
    • A fascinating discussion of an on first sight mundane and boring topic. Singh goes through the history and the solution to Fermat’s famous last mathematical theorem, bringing forth both fascinating characters and the discoveries of science.

 

The worth of science and the darkness of superstition – a message from Carl Sagan

I found this video on YouTube, one of my absolute favourite pieces from Carl Sagan’s magnificent series Cosmos: a Personal Voyage (episode 8, ”Journeys through Space and Time”). An excellent message to be absorbed by all of humanity.

”What we do with our world, right now, will propagate down through the centuries and powerfully affect the destiny of our descendants. It is well within our power to destroy our civilization, and perhaps our species as well. If we capitulate to superstition, or greed, or stupidty we can plunge our world into a darkness deeper than time between the collapse of classical civilization and the Italian Renaissaince. But, we are also capable of using our compassion and our intelligence, our technology and our wealth, to make an abundant and meaningful life for every inhabitant of this planet. To enhance enormously our understanding of the Universe, and to carry us to the stars.”

Carl Sagan: ”The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark”

Carl Sagan’s 1997 ”The Demon-Haunted World” is a celebrated book deserving its celebration, one of the absolute best – if not the best – introductory books to scientific philosophy and skepticism for both the lay person and the academic. Throughout the 400 pages Sagan varies between discussing why certain paranormal concepts (especially ufology) is wrong, and discussing why we don’t need them in the first place – the beauty of science should be enough. Sagan postulates that science is not just a nice thing to have around for the practical technology it creates, but it is absolutely vital for our continuing survival as a species, a candle in the dark, flickering and trembling before the darkness of superstition.

Sagan puts this forth to excite the reader and make her think, while at the same time bringing both comic relief, grave seriousness and spirituality, in the agnostic way Sagan defines it. Sagan both plays with the ideas of extraterrestrial visits to Earth, and only pages later writes of the mixed emotions when facing his father’s death in a naturalistic world view.

Sagan’s final book before his 1997 death is not only a book for debunking pseudo-scientific claims (if that’s your goal, there are much better books and web sites). Much like his TV series Cosmos, ”The Demon-Haunted World” is a testament both to critical thinking and to the human species and the cosmos. Sagan doesn’t look down upon the human brain for its creation of  superstition and religion. He celebrates it, and he hopes it to continue its journey with science.

”I worry that, especially as the Millennium edges nearer, pseudo-science and superstition will seem year by year more tempting, the siren song of unreason more sonorous and attractive. Where have we heard it before? Whenever our ethnic or national prejudices are aroused, in times of scarcity, during challenges to national self-esteem or nerve, when we agonize about our diminished cosmic place and purpose, or when fanaticism is bubbling up around us-then, habits of thought familiar from ages past reach for the controls. The candle flame gutters. Its little pool of light trembles. Darkness gathers. The demons begin to stir.”

– Carl Sagan: ”The Demon-Haunted World”

Quote of the Day #22

The fact that some geniuses were laughed at does not imply that all who are laughed at are geniuses. They laughed at Columbus, they laughed at Fulton, they laughed at the Wright brothers. But they also laughed at Bozo the Clown.

Carl Sagan